Thursday, February 18

Robert Peel (1857-1941) Test Cap No: 50

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Full name Robert Peel
Born February 12, 1857, Churwell, Leeds, Yorkshire
Died August 12, 1941, Morley, Leeds, Yorkshire (aged 84 years 181 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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© 'Cricket' magazine
Bobby Peel, who died at Morley, on August 12, aged 84, was one of the finest allround cricketers of any time. Primarily he was a bowler, the second in the remarkable succession of slow left-handers -- Edmund Peate, Peel, Wilfred Rhodes and Hedley Verity -- who rendered such brilliant service to Yorkshire over a period of sixty years. Born at Churwell, near Leeds, on February 12, 1857, Bobby Peel first played for his county in 1882, when Yorkshire were singularly rich in bowling talent, so that he had to wait several years before attaining real distinction. Still, being a capital fieldsman, especially at cover-point, and a punishing left-handed batsman, he kept his place in the team, and when Peate's connection with the county ceased in unhappy circumstances Peel came to the fore. For nine seasons, with his fine length, easy action and splendid command of spin, this sturdily built left-hander regularly took over 100 wickets for Yorkshire, his county total amounting to 1,550 at an average cost of 15 runs each. He was often a match-winner. In 1887 he took five Kent wickets for 14 runs in an innings and, with 43 runs in a low-scoring match, helped largely in a victory by four wickets.

Joe Hunter (1855-1891) Test Cap No:49

Full name Joe Hunter
Born August 3, 1855, Scarborough, Yorkshire
Died January 4, 1891, Rotherham, Yorkshire (aged 35 years 154 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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In a career cut short by the ill-health that eventually led to his premature death, Joe Hunter kept wicket for his native Yorkshire, and for England. He debuted for Yorkshire in 1878, and was a first-rate wicketkeeper, although not quite of the calibre of some of his contemporaries. He toured Australia in 1884-85, and played in all five Tests. He kept tidily, and in the second Test helped Briggs put on 98 for the last wicket, an important contribution to an England win in a closely-fought series. By 1888, however he dropped out of the first-class game (replaced in the Yorkshire XI by his brother David), Joseph Joe Hunter was a professional cricketer, who played 143 matches for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1878 and 1888.Hunter also played five Test matches for England.

Born in Scarborough, Yorkshire, England, Hunter, who was one of five brothers, learnt his cricket on the beach at Scarborough and went on to become a first-class wicket-keeper. Although not rated as amongst the best of his contemporaries, he went on Alfred Shaw's tour of Australia in 1884/5, and it was there that he played his five Tests. He was dogged by ill-health, however, and retired from cricket in 1888, when he was replaced as Yorkshire's wicket-keeper by his brother, David.Hunter originally was a stonemason, but went on to become a pub landlord.Hunter died in January 1891 in Rotherham, Yorkshire, aged 35.

Test debut Australia v England at Adelaide, Dec 12-16, 1884
Last Test Australia v England at Melbourne, Mar 21-25, 1885
First-class span1878-1888

Wilfred Flowers (1856-1926) Test Cap No:48

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Full name Wilfred Flowers
Born December 7, 1856, Calverton, Nottinghamshire
Died November 1, 1926, Carlton, Nottingham (aged 69 years 329 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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Wilfred Flower was the last survivor of the Notts XI that in 1878 played the opening match with the first Australian team to visit this country. A steady slow bowler with an offbreak, which rendered him extremely difficult on a soft wicket, a fine resolute batsman, and a capital field, Flowers was one of the best all-round cricketers of his time. Born at Calverton on December 7, 1856, but soon associated with Sutton-in-Ashfield--the great nursery of Notts cricket for many years--he was first engaged by the Workshop club when only 17. Three seasons later he was given a place in the Notts Colts match, and he at once made his mark by taking the wickets of five members of the County Eleven at a cost of only 8 runs. This performance naturally led to his appearance in the game between the M.C.C. and the Colts of England--at that period and for a long while afterwards the recognized test for the most promising of young professional cricketers. Again Flowers seized his chance for, if in the first innings he disposed of only one batsman, that player was none other than W. G. Grace, and in the second innings, when he obtained four wickets, he again enjoyed the distinction of dismissing the great man.

John Briggs (1862-1902) Test Cap No:47

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Full name John Briggs
Born October 3, 1862, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire
Died January 11, 1902, Heald Green, Cheadle, Cheshire (aged 39 years 100 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox
Relation Brother - JB Briggs

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© The Cricketer International
Johnny Briggs died on January 11. The last reports as to the condition of Briggs's health had been so discouraging that the news of his death did not cause much surprise. Though he rallied so wonderfully from his seizure at Leeds, during the Test match in 1899, as to bowl with nearly all his old skill and success throughout the season of 1900, it was known that his ailment -- a form of epilepsy -- admitted of no permanent cure, and was liable to recur at any time. He had another attack sooner than had been expected; was compelled to go back to Cheadle Asylum; and took no part in the cricket of 1901. Five or six weeks before his death it was announced that he had again rallied after a serious relapse, but this time the improvement was of very brief duration. Briggs had a long career, but at the time of his death he was only a little over thirty-nine. Like so many other famous professional cricketers,

William Attewell (1861-1927) Test Cap No:46

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Full name William Attewell
Born June 12, 1861, Keyworth, Nottinghamshire
Died June 11, 1927, Long Eaton, Derbyshire (aged 65 years 364 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

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© En.wikipedia.org
A cricketer of considerable accomplishments, William Attewell (known as Dick to his team-mates) was best known as a bowler of unremitting accuracy and length. He bowled at medium pace, varying pace, flight and spin cleverly, and rarely bowled a loose ball. He used his abilities to perfect "off theory", popular in the 1890s, where he frustrated the batsman by bowling wide of the off stump to a packed off-side field. He was a fine fielder in the covers, and a more than useful batsman with a first-class century to his name (and a double hundred for MCC v Northumberland). A Nottinghamshire man, he came into the county side in 1881, and rarely left it until his retirement nineteen years later. He took 100 wickets in a season ten times, and toured Australia three times, most successfully in 1887-8.After retirement he became a first-class umpire, and later the professional at Shrewsbury School, where a young Neville Cardus was his assistant. His brother Thomas also played briefly for Nottinghamshire.

Test debut Australia v England at Adelaide, Dec 12-16, 1884
Last Test Australia v England at Adelaide, Mar 24-28, 1892
First-class span 1881-1899

Stanley Christopherson (1861-1949) Test Cap No:45

Full name Stanley Christopherson
Born November 11, 1861, Kidbrooke, Blackheath, Kent
Died April 6, 1949, St John's Wood, London (aged 87 years 146 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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The best player of the ten Christopherson brothers of Kent (they often fielded a family XI, with their father making up the side), Stanley was a fine fast-medium bowler. He had a long run (by the standards of the time), bowled with a high action, and kept a good length. He had an excellent yorker. He played for Kent between 1883 and 1888 but was severely restricted by an arm injury incurred in 1886. His best period was probably the 1883 and 1884 seasons.

Timothy Carew O'Brien (1861-1948) Test Cap No:44

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Full name Timothy Carew O'Brien
Born November 5, 1861, Dublin, Ireland
Died December 9, 1948, Ramsey, Isle of Man (aged 87 years 34 days)
Major teams England, Ireland, Middlesex, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm bowler

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Sir Timothy "Tim" Carew O'Brien, 3rd Baronet was born at Dublin on 5 November 1861 and died at Ramsey, Isle of Man on 9 December 1948. He was an Irish baronet who played cricket for England in five Test matches.A forceful right-handed batsman, O'Brien played in 266 first class cricket matches as an amateur for Oxford University (where he studied at New Inn Hall and won a Blue in 1884) and 1885 and in fairly regular appearances for Middlesex through to 1898. His 92 for Oxford against the 1884 Australians was instrumental in the university's only victory over an Australian team. He played for England against Australia at Old Trafford that year and again four years later at Lord's, but in neither game did his distinguish himself.

He toured with MCC teams twice: in 1887–88 he went with George Vernon to Australia and in 1895–96 he went with Lord Hawke's side to South Africa, where he acted as captain once against South Africa at Port Elizabeth in February 1896, winning the game largely as a result of George Lohmann's match return of 15/45 (7/38 and 8/7).In county cricket, he was known for hard hitting innings, with a highest score of 202, scored as part of a partnership with Robert Slade Lucas that put on 338 in 200 minutes.Uniquely, O'Brien captained Ireland as well as England, recording a top score of 167 against his alma mater for the country of his birth during a brief Irish tour of England. This remained an Irish record until 1973.

O'Brien married Gundrered Annette Teresa de Trafford, daughter of Sir Humphrey de Trafford 2nd baronet on 26 September 1885 at All Saints Church, Barton upon Irwell and they had 10 children, the eldest of whom, Timothy Jnr., died in Flanders during the First World War. Sir Timothy was, at the time of his death in 1948, the oldest cricketer to have played in England-Australia Tests. His brother John also played international cricket for Ireland.

Test debut England v Australia at Manchester, Jul 10-12, 1884
Last Test South Africa v England at Cape Town, Mar 21-23, 1896
First-class span 1881-1914

George Frederick Vernon (1856-1902) Test Cap No:43

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Full name George Frederick Vernon
Born June 20, 1856, Marylebone, London
Died August 10, 1902, Elmina, Gold Coast (aged 46 years 51 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style (unknown arm) slow (underarm)

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George Vernon, who died at Elmina, West Africa, on August 10th, was scarcely one of the great batsmen of his day, but he had a long and distinguished career in the cricket field. Born in June, 1856, he made his first appearance at Lord's as a member of the Rugby XI in 1873, and so recently as 1897 he took part in first-class matches, making scores of over 50 against both the Universities. For many years he played regularly for Middlesex, and for that county and the M.C.C. the greater part of his best work was done.

Edward Ferdinando Sutton Tylecote (1849-1938) Test Cap No:42

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Edward Ferdinando Sutton Tylecote
Born June 23, 1849, Marston Moretaine, Bedfordshire
Died March 15, 1938, New Hunstanton, Norfolk (aged 88 years 265 days)
Major teams England, Kent, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Edmund Tylecote showed such exceptional form as a boy that he was in the Clifton College eleven five years, finishing as captain in 1868. That summer he made the then record score of 404 during three spells of two hours each for Modern vs. Classical, carrying his bat through an innings of 630. He got his blue at Oxford as a Freshman and his second experience against Cambridge was in the "Cobden match." Next year he led the Dark Blues to victory by eight wickets, but in his second season as captain, Cambridge won by an innings and 166, William Yardley setting up a record with his second hundred in University matches. Mr. Tylecote was the oldest living University Captain.
When a mathematical tutor at Royal Military Academy, Tylecote played for Kent and perhaps his best performance for the County was a perfect not out hundred against the 1832 Australian team, when T. W. Garrett--still alive, aged 80--and G. E. Palmer were carrying all before them. W. H. Patterson, the present chairman of the Kent County Committee, played a fine second innings in the same match. Tylecote also assisted Bedfordshire, the county of his birth.

George Brown Studd (1859-1945) Test Cap No:41

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Full name George Brown Studd
Born October 20, 1859, Netheravon, Wiltshire
Died February 13, 1945, Pasadena, California, United States of America (aged 85 years 116 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat

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three cricketing brothers,Sir J. E. Kynaston Studd,
George Brown Studd,& C. T. Studd / © npg.org.uk
George Brown Studd, died on February 13, aged 85. The second eldest of three famous cricketing brothers, Sir J. E. Kynaston Studd and C. T. Studd being the others, all of whom played for both Eton and Cambridge, and established a record by captaining the University in consecutive years. Born at Netheravon House, near Amesbury, Wiltshire, on October 20, 1859, G. B. Studd got his Colours for Eton in 1877 when he scored 32 and 23 against Harrow and 54 against Winchester. He fared less well in the following year, but going up to Cambridge he got his Blue as a Freshman and appeared in the University match four times. Against Oxford in 1880 he made 38 and 40, and two years later, when captain of the Light Blues, he played a great innings of 120 which was the seventh three-figure score, and, at the time, the second highest in University matches. True to Eton form he showed special skill and power in driving, notably to the off, and in the field saved many runs by sure picking up, but did not always hold a catch. He enjoyed his best season for Cambridge in 1881, in which year and the following summer all three brothers were in the University Eleven. In 1882 he made 819 runs in first-class matches--a big achievement in those days--and put together for the Cambridge Long Vacation Club 289 in a grand display of forcing cricket. In the autumn G. B. and C. T. Studd went with the team taken out to Australia by the Hon. Ivo Bligh (afterwards Earl of Darnley) which brought back the The Ashes by defeating W. L. Murdoch's team in two out of three matches, but G. B. failed to produce his best form. He assisted Middlesex occasionally from 1879 to 1886.

Walter William Read (1855-1907) Test Cap No:40

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Walter William Read
Born November 23, 1855, Reigate, Surrey
Died January 6, 1907, Bingham Road, Addiscombe Park, Surrey (aged 51 years 44 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast (roundarm), Right-arm slow (underarm)

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Mr. W. W. Read died on Sunday, January 6th, at his residence, Colworth Road, Addiscombe Park. More than nine years have passed away since Mr. Read dropped out of the Surrey eleven and gave up first-class cricket, but his wonderful play during a long career is vividly remembered. Beyond question he was one of the greatest batsmen the game has known, holding a high place among those nearest in merit to W. G. Grace. Born on November 23rd, 1855, he was in his fifty-second year. He had been in poor health for some little time, but his illness did not assume a dangerous form until a week before his death.

While still quite a lad Mr. Read showed extreme promise as a batsman in local cricket at Reigate, and soon came under the notice of the Surrey committee, with the result that he was given his first trial for the county before he was eighteen, playing against Yorkshire at The Oval in the season of 1873. He was put to rather a severe test against the bowling of Hill and Tom Emmett, but, though he scored only 3 and 14, his form was so good that no doubt could be felt as to his ultimate success. At the outset of his career, and for some years afterwards, he assisted his father as a schoolmaster at Reigate, and could only spare time to play for Surrey in the latter part of the summer. Still, though his opportunities were restricted, he steadily improved, and in 1877 he took his place among the best batsmen of his day, playing an innings of 140 against Yorkshire at The Oval, and, with the late Henry Jupp as his partner, sending up 206 for the first wicket.

Charles Frederick Henry Leslie (1961-1921) Test Cap No:39

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Full name Charles Frederick Henry Leslie
Born December 8, 1861, Mayfair, Westminster, London
Died February 12, 1921, Mayfair, Westminster, London (aged 59 years 66 days)
Major teams England, Middlesex, Oxford University
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast

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harles Frederick Henry Leslie (8 December 1861 in Mayfair, Westminster, London, England – 12 February 1921 in Mayfair, Westminster, London, England) was a cricketer who played first-class cricket for eight years between 1881 and 1888. Leslie played his cricket for Oxford University, Middlesex and England.Leslie was a hard-hitting batsman with a solid defence, a useful right-arm fast bowler and an athletic cover-point. Cricket captain at Rugby School in his last three years, he was an outstanding public schoolboy cricketer. He won blues in cricket in each of his three seasons at Oxford (1881–83) and also at racquets and football.His performances won him selection for the Honourable Ivo Bligh's tour side to Australia in 1882/3 where he was part of the team that regained the Ashes. His Test career comprised all four matches for Bligh's team when he scored 106 runs at 15.14 and took four wickets at 11.00. The first three matches were played against Billy Murdoch's 1882 touring team and counted for the Ashes; Leslie did not take a wicket in the last two of those Tests. The urn was not at stake for the fourth match played against a combined Australian side when Leslie took one first innings wicket.

Ivo Francis Walter Bligh (1859-1927) Test Cap No:38

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Full name Ivo Francis Walter Bligh
Born March 13, 1859, Westminster, London
Died April 10, 1927, Puckle Hill House, Shorne, Kent (aged 68 years 28 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat
Height 6 ft 3 in

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© En.wikipedia.org
Ivo Bligh, who in 1900 became the 8th Earl of Darnley, was an extremely talented sportsman who won Blues at racquets and tennis as well as cricket. An excellent fielder and attacking batsman, his first-class career was short as he suffered from poor health from an early age. By the time he stopped playing he had represented the Gentleman and led the 1882-83 tour to Australia where the Ashes were regained, and where he was presented with the urn which is till played for to this day. On his death in 1927 his widow presented the urn to the MCC.

The 8th Earl of Darnley, born in Bruton Street, London, on March 13, 1859, died peacefully in his sleep of heart failure at Puckle Hill, Cobham, Kent, on April 10, aged 68. It was in October, 1900, that he had succeeded to the Earldom. As a small boy he received some coaching from Farmer Bennett, and at Cheam, where he had some of the Studds among his companions, his bowling gained him a place in the Eleven. Naturally, he developed his cricket considerably whilst at Eton, and in his four matches against Harrow and Winchester--in 1876 and 1877--made 106 runs with an average of 26.50, his highest innings being 73 against the latter side in 1876. Eton won three of the four games with an innings to spare: the other, against Harrow in 1877, was drawn with the position fairly open. A feature of Mr. Bligh's batting was his driving--he was 6ft. 3ins. In height--and, until ill-health handicapped him, he was a capital long-field and point. At Cambridge he gained his Blue as a Freshman, being the last choice, and so was a member of the famous team of 1878, which played eight matches and won them all--that against the Australians, at Lord's by an innings and 72 runs.

Charles Thomas Studd (1860-1931) Test Cap No:37

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Full name Charles Thomas Studd
Born December 2, 1860, Spratton, Northamptonshire
Died July 16, 1931, Ibambi, Belgian Congo (aged 70 years 226 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Gentlemen of India, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium-fast

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Charles Thomas Studd, the youngest and most famous of three brothers all of whom played for Eton, Cambridge University and Middlesex, was born at Spatton, Northants., on December 2, 1860, and died at Ibambi in the Belgian Congo on July 16. Each of the three brothers enjoyed the distinction of captaining the Cambridge Eleven--G. B. in 1882, C. T. in 1883 and J. E. K. in 1884. J. E. K.,the eldest--Lord Mayor of London in 1929--left Eton in 1877 but did not go up to Cambridge until 1881. All three figured in the Eton Eleven of 1877 and also in the Cambridge Elevens of 1881 and 1882.

A great batsman, a fine field and a high-class bowler, C. T. Studd developed his powers so rapidly that, while still at Cambridge, he was in the best Eleven of England. He possessed a fine upright style in batting and was particularly strong on the off-side. He bowled right-hand rather above medium pace and, tall of build, brought the ball over from a good height.

John Maurice Read (1859-1929) Test Cap No:36

Full name John Maurice Read
Born February 9, 1859, Thames Ditton, Surrey
Died February 17, 1929, Winchester, Hampshire (aged 70 years 8 days)
Major teams England, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast-medium

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By the standards of the time, Maurice Read had a relatively short career. He played for 15 seasons before, at the age of 36 and after a season in which he had scored 1031 runs at 31, he retired to take an appointment on the Tichborne Park estate. Read made his debut for Surrey in 1880 and immediately won a regular place in the side as a hard-hitting batsman, an occasional fast bowler and an excellent specialist third man. The Surrey side at that time was strong - they won five Championships in six seasons - and for almost a decade Read was also a fixture in the England team, making four tours to Australia and playing in early Tests in South Africa.

Arthur Shrewsbury (1856-1903) Test Cap No:35

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Full name Arthur Shrewsbury
Born April 11, 1856, New Lenton, Nottinghamshire
Died May 19, 1903, Gedling, Nottinghamshire (aged 47 years 38 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm bowler
Relation Brother - W Shrewsbury

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© The Cricketer International
© The Cricketer International
For almost a decade starting in the late 1880s Arthur Shrewsbury was arguably the finest batsman in the world. WG Grace, his main rival for that accolade, was once asked who he'd most like to have in his side, and said simply: "Give me Arthur." With a game built around an impregnable defence based on his pads, Shrewsbury was a magnificent runmaker especially on bad or so-called sticky wickets, scoring many of his greatest hundreds on pitches his partners found impossible to master.

 The best-known of these knocks came against Australia at Lord's in 1886, when he scored a masterly 164 against the might of Fred Spofforth, on a pitch deemed "impossible" by his peers. Seven years later he repeated the feat, with a well-made 106 - again at Lord's against Australia - in equally trying conditions, on a sticky wicket against Charles "The Terror" Turner. Even in 1902, his final season, by which time he was 47, Shrewsbury managed to top the first-class averages (1250 runs at 50), as he had done half-a-dozen times in his heyday. Sadly, though, he shot himself the following year after a bout of depression.A quiet, humble man, his passing was mourned all over the cricket-playing world - but especially in Nottinghamshire, the county which he served grandly for nearly three decades.

Test debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Dec 31, 1881 - Jan 4, 1882
Last Test England v Australia at Manchester, Aug 24-26, 1893
First-class span 1875-1902

William Henry Scotton (1856-1893) Test Cap No:34

© The Cricketer International
Full name William Henry Scotton
Born January 15, 1856, Nottingham
Died July 9, 1893, St John's Wood, London (aged 37 years 175 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast-medium
Relation Cousin - G Howitt

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William Scotton, who died by his own hand on July 9, was born on January 15, 1856, and was thus in his thirty-eighth year. For some time previous to his tragic end he had been in a very low, depressed condition, the fact that he had lost his place in the Notts eleven having, so it was stated at the inquest, preyed very seriously upon his mind. Scotton played his first match at Lord"s for Sixteen Colts of England against the M.C.C. on the 11th and 12th of May, 1874, scoring on that occasion 19 and 0. He was engaged as a groundman by the M.C.C. in that year and 1875, and after an engagement at Kennington Oval returned to the service of the M.C.C., of whose ground staff he was a member at the time of his death. His powers were rather slow to ripen, and he had been playing for several years before he obtained anything like a first-rate position.

Richard Pilling (1855-1891) Test Cap No:33

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Full name Richard Pilling
Born August 11, 1855, Old Warden, Bedfordshire
Died March 28, 1891, Old Trafford, Manchester, Lancashire (aged 35 years 229 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Richard Pilling was born at Bedford on July 5, 1855, and, so far as we are aware, it was not until many years later that he became associated with Lancashire-the only county with which he has had any cricket connection. His first appearance in the Lancashire eleven dates back to the season of 1877, and the present writer can well recollect being immensely struck with the work done behind the wicket by the then almost unknown player in a match at Maidstone between Lancashire and Kent. His appearance for Lancashire was very happily timed, as, with Mr. E. Jackson so often prevented by business reasons from playing, the northern county might have been left without a first-class wicket-keeper. Almost from the first time he was seen in the Lancashire team it was felt that a great wicket-keeper had arisen, and he at once sprang into the front rank. From August, 1877, down to the end of the season of 1889 he was a regular member of the Lancashire eleven, and several pages of WISDEN might easily be filled with a record of his doings. For all the hard work he has done in the cricket field, Pilling has never been constitutionally robust, and we believe that the serious illness which kept him out of the cricket field in 1890 originated in a severe cold which he caught during the winter when taking part in a football match. At the end of the summer he journeyed to Australia for the benefit of his health, leaving in the same steamer that took a large proportion of the Australian team. Much might be said about Pilling's special excellence as a wicket-keeper, but we will content ourselves by expressing a very strong opinion that during the last twelve years he has had no superior but Blackham.

Edmund Peate (1855-1900) Test Cap No:32

Full name Edmund Peate
Born March 2, 1855, Holbeck, Leeds, Yorkshire
Died March 11, 1900, Newlay, Horsforth, Yorkshire (aged 45 years 9 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Slow left-arm orthodox

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© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Ted Peate's career was brief but never dull. He started as part of a traveling side - known as the `Clown Cricketers' - and was spotted and recruited by Yorkshire. A legspinner who relied on accuracy rather than great turn, he was at his best on wet wickets and, for a few seasons, was arguably the best bowler in the world. In 1881-82 at The Oval he opened the bowling and took 4 for 31 and 4 for 40 (England lost by seven runs) and in 1883 took 8 for 5 against Surrey and was criticised for ending the match early and so halving gate receipts! But he fell foul of the despotic Lord Hawke at Yorkshire and his county career was effectively ended by 1886 - he was still only 31. He continued to play with great success in Leeds club cricket, despite an ever expanding girth, and died of pneumonia a few days after his 45th birthday. Wisden wrote that "he would have lasted longer had he ordered his life more carefully".

Willie Bates (1855-1900) Test Cap No:30

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Full name Willie Bates
Born November 19, 1855, Lascelles Hall, Huddersfield, Yorkshire
Died January 8, 1900, Lepton, Huddersfield, Yorkshire (aged 44 years 50 days)
Major teams England, Yorkshire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

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© En.wikipedia.org
Willie Bates, known as Billy was an English all-round cricketer. Excellent with both bat and ball, Bates scored over 10,000 first-class runs, took more than 870 wickets and was always reliable in the field. A snappy dresser, Bates was also known as "The Duke".Born to a humble family in Lascelles Hall, Huddersfield, Yorkshire, Bates became a professional cricketer for Rochdale in 1873 and made his first-class debut for Yorkshire four years later, taking four for 69 in Middlesex's first innings to begin a ten-year career in the first-class game. He played fifteen Test matches for England between 1881–82 and 1886–87, all of them in Australia.At the Melbourne Cricket Ground in 1882–83, Bates excelled by scoring 55 in England's only innings before taking 7 for 28 (including a hat-trick) to force Australia to follow on. He then claimed 7 for 74 in the second innings to help his team to the first-ever innings victory in Test cricket.

Bates set several individual records in this game as his hat-trick was the first for England in Test cricket, and his return of 7 for 28, and his match tally of 14 wickets, were then the best-ever by a Test match bowler. In addition, no Test bowler had previously taken 10 or more wickets and scored a half-century in the same match.

Richard Gorton Barlow (1851-1919) Test Cap No:29

© ESPNcricinfo Ltd
Full name Richard Gorton Barlow
Born May 28, 1851, Barrow Bridge, Bolton, Lancashire
Died July 31, 1919, Stanley Park, Blackpool, Lancashire (aged 68 years 64 days)
Major teams England, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm medium
Other Umpire

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Dick Barlow was a dour and resolute opening batsman who was the first to really use forward play defensively, and was so passionate about the game that he continued playing club cricket well into his sixties as well as being a capable umpire who stood in one Test in 1899. Hard to dismiss, Barlow is remembered for his association with fellow Lancashire opener Albert Hornby, who was his antithesis with the bat, and they were immortalised in one of the game's most famous poems by Francis Thompson:"As the run-stealers flicker to and fro,To and fro,O my Hornby and my Barlow long ago"He also developed into a very good slow-medium left-armer with immaculate length, clever variation, and a good eye for batsmen's weaknesses. He took a wicket with his first ball in first-class cricket and took four first-class hat-tricks. He carried his bat 11 times, including a two-hour innings of 5 not out (made out of 69) against Nottinghamshire in 1882.

Barlow toured Australia three times, playing in every match on each occasion, and he also played against Australia seven times at home. Although his highest Test score was only 62, Barlow played several valuable defensive innings in difficult circumstances. As a bowler he was more successful; his 7 for 44 at Manchester in 1886 was a match-winning performance. Playing for North of England against the Australian tourists in 1884 he took 10 wickets in the match, and then made a superb hundred (one of only four first-class centuries in his career) against Spofforth at his best. For the Players in the same year he captured a remarkable hat-trick of Gentlemen - WG, Shuter and Read falling to successive deliveries.

Close to the end of his life Barlow was quoted in the Manchester Guardian as saying: "I don't think any cricketer has enjoyed his cricketing career better than I have done, and if I had my time to come over again I should certainly be what I have been all my life - a professional cricketer.Away from cricket, he kept goal to county level at football and was also a top sprinter.

Test debut Australia v England at Melbourne, Dec 31, 1881 - Jan 4, 1882
Last Test Australia v England at Sydney, Feb 25-Mar 1, 1887
First-class span 1871-1891
Umpiring Career
Only Test England v Australia at Nottingham, Jun 1-3, 1899

Allan Gibson Steel (1858-1914) Test Cap No:28

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Full name Allan Gibson Steel
Born September 24, 1858, West Derby, Liverpool, Lancashire
Died June 15, 1914, Hyde Park, London (aged 55 years 264 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Lancashire
Batting style Right-hand bat

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An outstanding allrounder, rated by his peers as second only to WG Grace, Allan Steel made the first Test hundred at Lord's, 148 to inspire England to victory over Australia in 1884. He played in eight Tests between 1880 and 1888, averaging 35 with the bat and 20 with the ball. Although primarily a bastman, he was highly rated in his early years as a slow-medium bowler, and in 1878 headed the All England averages with 164 wickets, although Wisden noted that he "owed his success to a certain trickiness, with the usual result that as batsmen found his tricks out, so did he become rather less effective". Though not a regular captain of county or country, he had an improbable run of success as skipper: Marlborough over Rugby, Cambridge over Oxford, Gentlemen over Players, Lancashire over Yorkshire and England over Australia. A fiendishly accurate right-arm slow bowler with the ability to spin the ball both ways, Steel became MCC President in 1902 but died in London in 1914 aged 56.

Test debut England v Australia at The Oval, Sep 6-8, 1880
Last Test England v Australia at Lord's, Jul 16-17, 1888
First-class span 1877-1893

Frank Penn (1851-1916) Test Cap No:27

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Full name Frank Penn
Born March 7, 1851, The Cedars, Lee, Lewisham, London
Died December 26, 1916, Bifrons, Patrixbourne, Kent (aged 65 years 294 days)
Major teams England, Kent
Batting style Right-hand bat

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Frank Penn, the famous Kent batsman of a generation back, died on the 26th of December at his home, Bifrons, near Canterbury. Though little of nothing had been seen of him in the cricket field for 35 years he was far indeed from forgotten. Born at Lewisham on March 7, 1851, Mr. Penn had a short but very brilliant career, ranking for several years among the finest batsmen of his day. He had a free, commanding style, and combined strong defence with splendid hitting. Stepping out of ordinary club cricket into first-class matches, he was, from the beginning, thoroughly at home in his new surroundings. He began to play for Kent in 1875, and in the following year he was seen at Lord's for the first time, scoring 44 and 35 for M.C.C. against Yorkshire. No doubt was felt as to his class. Indeed he made such an impression that he was picked for Gentlemen against Players in 1876, both at the Oval and Lord's. Thenceforward he was in the front rank. Unfortunately, his health gave way just when he was at the height of his fame.

Frederick Morley (1850-1884) Test Cap No:26

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Full name Frederick Morley
Born December 16, 1850, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire
Died September 28, 1884, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire (aged 33 years 287 days)
Major teams England, Nottinghamshire
Batting style Left-hand bat
Bowling style Left-arm fast

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At his peak, Fred Morley was regarded as the fastest bowler in England. A left-armer, what he lacked in height he more than made up for in accuracy and in a 13-year career he took more than 1200 first-class wickets. His batting is best forgotten and he was also something of a liability in the field. But with the ball he was devastating. He took 100 wickets in a season seven times, and in 1878 took 197 at 12.16. A year earlier, he had taken 13 for 14 for MCC against Oxford University (who were bowled out for 12) and in 1878 he took 15 for 35 on a bad pitch for Nottinghamshire against Kent. In 1879-80 he toured Canada and the USA with Richard Daft and returned with 100 wickets at 3.54.

Alfred Lyttelton (1857-1913) Test Cap No:25

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Full name Alfred Lyttelton
Born February 7, 1857, Westminster, London
Died July 5, 1913, Marylebone, London (aged 56 years 148 days)
Major teams England, Cambridge University, Middlesex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow (underarm)
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

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Alfred Lyttelton was one of the best amateur sportsmen of his generation and came from a family who excelled at sport - seven of his brothers played either first-class or good club cricket. He made his mark at Eton and then Cambridge as one of the best amateur wicketkeepers in the country, standing up without a long-stop in an era when that was rare, and in 1878 was in the Cambridge XI that beat the Australians. He played in four of the first five Tests against Australia in England in 1880, 1882 and 1884, and in his last appearance took of his pads and, bowling underarm lobs, took 4 for 8 on the second morning.

He was the first man to play football and cricket for England, but sport was only ever a pastime and he retired by the time he was 28 to further his political ambitions. He later became an MP and Colonial Secretary, possibly helped by the fact he was appointed by Arthur Balfour, his brother-in-law. He was also president of the MCC in 1898.

Test debut England v Australia at The Oval, Sep 6-8, 1880
Last Test England v Australia at The Oval, Aug 11-13, 1884
First-class span 1876-1887

William Gilbert Grace (1848-1915) Test Cap No:24

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Full name William Gilbert Grace
Born July 18, 1848, Downend, Bristol
Died October 23, 1915, Mottingham, Kent (aged 67 years 97 days)
Major teams England, Gentlemen, Gloucestershire, London County, Marylebone Cricket Club, South of England
Batting style Right-hand bat
Relation Brother - EM Grace, Brother - GF Grace, Cousin - WG Rees, Cousin - GHB Gilbert, Cousin - WL Rees, Cousin - WJ Pocock, Cousin - WR Gilbert, Son - WG Grace jnr, Son - CB Grace,
Nephew - H Grace, Nephew - NV Grace

introdution
William Gilbert ("W.G.") Grace, MRCS, LRCP (born 18 July 1848 at Downend, near Bristol; died 23 October 1915 at Mottingham, Kent) was an English amateur cricketer who is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest players of all time, having a special significance in terms of his importance to the development of the sport. Universally known as W.G, he played first-class cricket for a record-equalling 44 seasons, from 1865 to 1908, during which he captained England, Gloucestershire County Cricket Club, the Gentlemen, MCC, the United South of England Eleven and several other teams. He came from a cricketing family in which one of his elder brothers was E.M. Grace and his younger brother was Fred Grace; their joint appearance for England in 1880 was the first time three brothers played together in Test cricket.Right-handed as both batsman and bowler, Grace dominated the sport during his career and left, through his technical innovations and enormous influence, a lasting legacy. An outstanding all-rounder, he excelled at all the essential skills of batting, bowling and fielding, but it is for his batting that he is most renowned as he is held to have invented modern batsmanship. An opening batsman, he was particularly noted for his mastery of all strokes and his level of expertise was said by contemporary reviewers to be unique. He generally captained the teams he played for at all levels because of his skill and tactical acumen.Grace was a medical practitioner who qualified in 1879. Because of his profession, he was nominally an amateur cricketer but he is said to have made more money from his cricketing activities than any professional. He was an extremely competitive player and, although he was one of the most famous men in England, he was also one of the most controversial on account of his gamesmanship and his financial acumen.He took part in other sports: he was a champion 440 yard hurdler as a young man and also played football for the Wanderers. In later life, he developed enthusiasm for golf, lawn bowls and curling.

George Frederick Grace (1850-1880) Test Cap No:23

Full name George Frederick Grace
Born December 13, 1850, Downend, Bristol
Died September 22, 1880, Basingstoke, Hampshire (aged 29 years 284 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Relation Brother - H Grace, Brother - EM Grace, Brother - WG Grace, Cousin - GHB Gilbert, Cousin - WR Gilbert, Nephew - AH Grace, Nephew - WG Grace jnr, Nephew - CB Grace, Nephew - NV Grace

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George Frederick ("Fred") Grace (1850–1880) was the youngest of the three Grace brothers to play Test cricket for England.Although his elder brothers E. M. and W. G. were always "known by (their) initials", the younger Grace was known as Fred, although his initials were used in scorecards like those of all other English cricketers.Gloucestershire CCC in 1880 shortly before Fred Grace's untimely death. Fred Grace (hooped cap) is third left in rear group. W. G. Grace is seated front left centre. Billy Midwinter (directly behind WG) is fourth left in rear (next to Fred). E. M. Grace (bearded) is sixth left in rear.
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Born 13 December 1850 in Bristol, Grace was "an attractive batsman",but one who "lacked the concentration and resolve to build a long innings".Like his two famous brothers he made a duck on his first-class debut.Grace was selected along with his two brothers to play in the inaugural Test in England, which took place at The Oval in 1880 against Australia.He was out for nought in both innings but held a "skyscraping catch" at the Vauxhall End off the giant Australian batsman George Bonnor

On 22 September 1880, Two weeks after his Test appearance, Fred Grace died in Basingstoke, Hampshire of pneumonia, caught, it was said, as the result of sleeping in a damp bed.W. R. Gilbert, a cousin of the Graces, wrote to The Daily Telegraph: "It having come to my knowledge there is a rumour abroad that Mr. G. F. Grace's fatal illness was caused by sleeping in a damp bed at the Red Lion Hotel, Basingstoke, I beg to contradict it. He had a bad cold before he left home, and on my arrival at Basingstoke he told me that he had received another chill whilst waiting at Reading Station. By inserting this you will greatly oblige me, and also do justice to the members of a family whose attention and kindness to my cousin all through his illness could not have been surpassed had he been at home." The Times wrote, "His manly and straightforward conduct and genial manners won him not only popularity, but the esteem of hosts and friends".3,000 people followed his coffin and the touring Australians wore black armbands during their last match.

Only Test England v Australia at The Oval, Sep 6-8, 1880 
First-class span 1866-1880

Edward Mills Grace (1841-1911) Test Cap No:22

© Wisden Cricket Monthly
Full name Edward Mills Grace
Born November 28, 1841, Downend, Bristol
Died May 20, 1911, Park House, Thornbury, Gloucestershire (aged 69 years 173 days)
Major teams England, Gloucestershire
Batting style Right-hand bat
Relation Brother - H Grace, Brother - WG Grace, Brother - GF Grace, Cousin - GHB Gilbert, Cousin - WR Gilbert, Son - NV Grace, Nephew - WG Grace jnr

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Edward Mills Grace died on May 20 after a long illness at his residence, Park House, Thornbury, Gloucestershire. But for the accident that his own brother proved greater than himself, E. M. Grace would have lived in cricket history as perhaps the most remarkable player the game has produced. Barring W.G., it would be hard indeed to name a man who was a stronger force on a side or a more remarkable match winner. Primarily, he was a batsman, but his value in an eleven went far beyond his power of getting runs. As a fieldsman at point--at a time when that position was far more important than it is in modern cricket--he never had an equal, and, though he did not pretend to be a first-rate bowler, he took during his career thousands of wickets. In his young days he bowled in the orthodox round-arm style, but his success in club cricket was gained by means of old-fashioned lobs. Fame came to him early in life. Born on November 28th, 1841, he made his first appearance at Lord's in 1861, and a year later he was beyond question the most dangerous bat in England. It was in the Canterbury Week in 1862 that, playing as an emergency for the M.C.C. against the Gentlemen of Kent, he scored 192 not out, and took all ten wickets in one innings. This was a 12 a-side and one man was absent in the second innings when he got the ten wickets. He reached his highest point as a batsman in 1863, scoring in all matches that year over 3,000 runs.